The Bonnier Gallery , Stand n° AM402

CASSH - Kathleen Jacobs

Kathleen Jacobs CASSH

Copper Blue Odd Niner - Carl Andre

Carl Andre Copper Blue Odd Niner

Untitled  - Mark di Suvero

Mark di Suvero Untitled

Sea Picture CLXI -  Richard Höglund

Richard Höglund Sea Picture CLXI

Horizontal Brushstrokes (More or Less) - Sol Lewitt

Sol Lewitt Horizontal Brushstrokes (More or Less)

Untitled (from on The Bowery) - Cy Twombly

Cy Twombly Untitled (from on The Bowery)

Society Portrait Maria Luisa de Romans - Andy Warhol

Andy Warhol Society Portrait Maria Luisa de Romans

Untitled 11R - Donald Judd

Donald Judd Untitled 11R

Exhibiting Artists

  • Carl Andre  (+)

    Biography : “My work is atheistic, materialistic and communistic. It’s atheistic because it’s without transcendent form, without spiritual or intellectual quality. Materialistic because it’d made out of its own materials without pretension to other materials. And communistic because the form is equally accessible to all men” ¬– Carl Andre Carl Andre is the overall-clad sculptor whom many historians consider a defining figure in the development of Conceptual and Minimalist art. Renowned for his ordered linear format and grid format sculptures. His works range from large public artworks to more intimate tile patterns arranged on the floor of an exhibition space. Andre considers himself one of the first “post-studio” artists because he uses manufactured industrial materials that he does not alter, but rather arranges on-site; common materials include square plates or blocks made of aluminum, nickel, zinc, copper, steel, lead, limestone, and wood. Many of his arrangements are also based on arithmetic and geometry. Andre has also published a book of poetry, and exhibited his work at numerous international institutions, including the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum and The Museum of Modern Art in New York City, the Martin-Gropius-Bau in Berlin, Germany, and the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C.

    Artist's Documents:

    Artist's Objects:

    • Carl Andre - Copper Blue Odd Niner Copper Blue Odd Niner

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  • CHRISTO

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  • Mark di Suvero  (+)

    Biography : “It is the reformation of material which is what art is al about… we reform it to where it does that tuning fork to our knowledge of form within.” ¬Mark di Suvero Mark di Suvero is an Abstract Expressionist sculptor who welds scrap metal into monumental outdoor sculptural works. Born in Shanghai to Italian parents, di Suvero moved to San Francisco as a child. He studied Fine Art and philosophy at the University of California, Berkeley, before moving to New York City, where he was immersed in the Abstract Expressionism that dominated the art scene. Following a serious injury while working in construction, di Suvero channeled all of his energy into sculpture. Refining his skills and creating freely modeled, smaller-scale sculp¬tures that incorporated steel, picking up a welding technique that he would continue to use in his later pieces. He welded large outdoor works from steel and found materials, such as tires and railroad ties. Later, he developed works based on industrial structures, such as welded or bolted l-beams and heavy gauge metal; he also incorporated motion into his pieces with swinging beams and rotating forms, allowing viewers and natural elements to interact with the sculpture.

    Artist's Documents:

    Artist's Objects:

    • Mark di Suvero - Untitled Untitled

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  • Richard Höglund  (+)

    Biography : Steeped in philosophy and language, Richard Höglund produces paintings and works on paper, all grounded in what he views as the most fundamental expressive form: drawing. As he explains: “Drawing is about making marks, and those marks need to be sensitive and responsive. The lines need to be unmediated as much as possible, to be made with the least amount of obstructions between mind, hand, tool, surface.” Using repetition and seriality along with nonobjective forms and patterns, Höglund’s lines are the fundamental layer within all of paintings. For Höglund, the act of drawing is as close as we can get to our thoughts before they become inevitably altered by language. The artist employs metalpoint to bring drawing into paintings without diminishing the value of the handwritten line. Utilizing pure silver, gold, iron, lead, bismuth, and copper, and Höglund uses alloys such as bronze, electrum, tin, and lead. Höglund studied art at the School of the Museum of Fine Arts and semiology at MIT in Boston, USA. He holds a MFA (DNSEP, 2008) obtained at the Haute école des arts du Rhin, in Strasbourg, France. In 2013, Höglund was selected by Tacita Dean to participate in her workshop at the Fundación Botín in Santander. His paintings are considerations of history and language.

    Artist's Objects:

    •  Richard Höglund - Sea Picture CLXI Sea Picture CLXI

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  • Kathleen Jacobs  (+)

    Artist's Objects:

    • Kathleen Jacobs  - CASSH CASSH

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  • Donald Judd  (+)

    Biography : “Usually when someone says a thing is too simple, they’re saying that certain familiar things aren’t there…” – Donald Judd With the intention of creating straightforward work that could assume a direct material and physical “presence” without recourse to grand philosophical statements, Donald Judd (1928-1994) eschewed the classical ideals of representational sculpture to create a rigorous visual vocabulary that sought clear and definite objects as its primary mode of articulation. Judd’s oeuvre has come to define what has been referred to as Minimal art—a label to which the artist strongly objected on the grounds of its generality.

    Detailed Description : Wood Cuts It was with ambivalence that Donald Judd first approached the woodcut medium in 1953. The physical, messy nature of carving the wood initially caused trepidation for an artist who did not like to work with his hands or fuss with tools. Yet the woodcut medium afforded Judd a crucial moment of artistic experimentation. His drawings and lithographs up to this point had included flowing lines and blended colors, but the hard birch woodcuts allowed only sharp, clean lines. Judd was thereby encouraged to graduate from his initial figurative experimentations of 1953 to briefly engage with the organic, abstract shapes of 1955-1960, before reaching the clarity and power of the parallelograms of 1961. The straight lines of these shapes, however, are difficult to create in wood, requiring cuts across the grain that surpassed Judd's skills and tools, and so he turned to his woodworking father, Roy, for assistance. Prior to his father's involvement, Judd would carve the wood himself before printing one or two copies. It was a process of thinking with his hands — thinking through doing. Once he had relinquished the labor of cutting the wood, Judd was able to take a step back and isolate the ideas in his head from the making process, which now required translation and became more deliberate. Together, father and son embarked on a collaborative printmaking venture that would free Judd from the burden of making and allow his woodcuts to evolve into the mature rectilinear forms

    Artist's Documents:

    Artist's Objects:

    • Donald Judd - Untitled 11R Untitled 11R

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  • Sol LeWitt  (+)

    Biography : Sol LeWitt “When an artist uses a conceptual form of art, it means that all of the planning and decisions are made beforehand and the execution is a perfunctory affair. The idea becomes a machine that makes the art. This kind of art is not theoretical or illustrative of theories; it is intuitive, it is involved with all types of mental processes and it is purposeless... Conceptual art is not necessarily logical.” - Sol LeWitt Sol LeWitt (1928-2007) was pivotal in the creation of the new radical aesthetic of the 1960's that was a revolutionary contradiction to the 'Abstract Expressionism' current in the 1950's and 60's New York school. He had no interest in inherent narrative or descriptive imagery. LeWitt, like no other artist of his generation, had always maintained the importance of the concept or idea and, apart from his original works on paper, the work is executed by others to clear and strict instructions. As one of the first coherent proponents of conceptual art with his writings, Sentences on Conceptual Art (1969), LeWitt's work continues to be regarded and referred to by a younger generation of artists as one of the seminal investigations into 'idea' and 'conceptual' art.

    Artist's Documents:

    Artist's Objects:

    • Sol Lewitt - Horizontal Brushstrokes (More or Less) Horizontal Brushstrokes (More or Less)

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  • Cy Twombly  (+)

    Biography : “My line is childlike but not childish. It is very difficult to fake. To get that quality you need to project yourself into the child's line. It has to be felt.” – Cy Twombly Cy Twombly (1928–2011) developed a gestural vocabulary in which each line and color is infused with energy, spirituality, and meaning. Emerging as a prominent figure in the mid-1950s following extensive travels throughout Europe and North Africa, he produced works that are simultaneously personal and mythological, allowing narrative, language, and inner visions to erupt from his intimate, abstract notations. Twombly was born in 1928 in Lexington, Virginia, and studied art in Boston and New York, then at Black Mountain College in North Carolina in the early 1950s. Although he was a contemporary of Robert Rauschenberg and Jasper Johns, his work soon digressed from the aims of American postwar abstraction. While prevailing tendencies of the period, such as Pop art, sought to abandon historical narratives altogether, Twombly directed his focus toward ancient, classical, and modern poetic traditions. In the late 1950s he moved to Italy, where he produced colorful, diagrammatic works, such as Ode to Psyche (1960), that feature erotic allusions and sly jokes while maintaining an abstract charge. Shortly thereafter the sebaceous, bright colors of these works gave way to the more austere grays and blues of the “blackboard” paintings, in which terse, white scrawls and loops recall the powdery effects of chalk on a blackboard.

    Artist's Documents:

    Artist's Objects:

    • Cy Twombly - Untitled (from on The Bowery) Untitled (from on The Bowery)

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  • Andy Warhol  (+)

    Biography : Andy Warhol Andy Warhol was born Andrew Warhola on August 6, 1928, in a two-room apartment at 73 Orr Street in a working-class neighborhood in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Carpatho-Rusyn immigrants from an area in the Carpathian Mountains in what is present-day Eastern Slovakia, his parents Andrej and Julia Warhola had three sons, Paul, John, and Andy, the youngest. In 1934, the family moved to their home at 3252 Dawson Street in Pittsburgh’s South Oakland neighborhood, which was closer to their church St. John Chrysostom Byzantine Catholic. Devout Byzantine Catholics, the family regularly attended mass and observed their Eastern European heritage. As a child, Warhol suffered from Sydenham chorea, a neurological disorder commonly known as St. Vitus dance, characterized by involuntary movements. When the disorder occasionally kept him home from school, Warhol would read comics and Hollywood magazines and play with paper cutouts. Growing up in Depression-era Pittsburgh, the family had few luxuries, but Warhol’s parents bought him his first camera when he was eight years old. He attended elementary at Holmes School and took free Tam O’Shanter art classes at Carnegie Institute (now Carnegie Museum of Art) taught by Joseph Fitzpatrick, before attending Schenley High School in 1942. Recognizing his son’s talent, Andrej saved money to pay for Warhol’s college education, and he attended Carnegie Institute of Technology (now Carnegie Mellon University) from 1945 to 1949. Throughout his life, Warhol fixated on his physical imperfections. As a child, Sydenham chorea (St. Vitus dance) occasionally kept him bedridden, and he had pigment issues that caused discoloration of his skin, leading to the nicknames “Spot” and “Andy the Red-nosed Warhola.” In response to his perceived physical flaws, Warhol cultivated different looks through his clothing, wigs, cosmetics, and plastic surgery to change the shape of his nose. Later in his life he had premature baldne

    Artist's Documents:

    Artist's Objects:

    • Andy Warhol - Society Portrait Maria Luisa de Romans Society Portrait Maria Luisa de Romans

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Other Represented Artists

About

The Bonnier Gallery is a Post-War & Contemporary art gallery operating in both primary and secondary market works across all media. Our core aim is to promote the visual and literary arts in South Florida and abroad. To that end, the gallery’s principal focus remains on providing a public space that fosters meaningful engagements between our exhibits and the cultural community. Through unique exhibitions, American & European art fairs, and scholarly catalogues, we seek to place our artists’ work in a wide range of international private and museum collections.

Contact

The Bonnier Gallery w:  http://www.thebonniergallery.com Founded:  2018 Grant Bonnier Christina Bonnier Amanda Baker