Helwaser Gallery

Constructivo a cinco tonos con dos figuras discutiendo - Joaquín Torres-García

Joaquín Torres-García Constructivo a cinco tonos con dos figuras discutiendo

L-1 - Richard Serra

Richard Serra L-1

Curve 2 - Richard Serra

Richard Serra Curve 2

Horizontal Brushstrokes in Color - Sol Lewitt

Sol Lewitt Horizontal Brushstrokes in Color

Nets Infinity - Yayoi Kusama

Yayoi Kusama Nets Infinity

Untitled, 1985 - George Condo

George Condo Untitled, 1985

Bedroom Blond, Black and Green Pillows - Tom Wesselmann

Tom Wesselmann Bedroom Blond, Black and Green Pillows

Drawing for Modern Painting Triptych II, 1967 - Roy Lichtenstein

Roy Lichtenstein Drawing for Modern Painting Triptych II, 1967

Exhibiting Artists

  • George Condo  (+)

    Biography : George Condo is best known for his provocative paintings that re-interpret Old Master paintings into humorous, audacious takes on portraiture. Born in New Hampshire, he became part of the influential East Village art scene in New York, and is credited with reviving the genre of portraiture in the 1980. His first public exhibitions took place in 1981, and made a name for his idiosyncratic style, which combined aesthetics from Picasso, de Kooning, and various other modern painters, into a pastiche. His unique paintings often feature characters in numerous situations, with expressions ranging from thrilled, to depressed, and even comical. His works have been collected by The Museum of Modern Art, New York, the National Gallery of Art in Washington, DC, the Rubell Family Collection, Miami, and many others.

    Artist's Objects:

    • George Condo - Untitled, 1985 Untitled, 1985

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  • Yayoi Kusama  (+)

    Biography : Avant-garde Japanese artist Yayoi Kusama was an influential figure in the postwar New York art scene, staging provocative happenings and exhibiting works such as her “Infinity Nets”, hallucinatory paintings of loops and dots (and physical representations of the idea of infinity). Narcissus Garden, an installation of hundreds of mirrored balls, earned Kusama notoriety at the 1966 Venice Biennale, where she attempted to sell the individual spheres to passersby. Kusama counted Donald Judd and Eva Hesse among her close friends, and is often considered an influence on Andy Warhol and a precursor to Pop art. Since her return to Japan in the 1970s, Kusama's work has continued to appeal to the imagination and the senses, including dizzying walk-in installations, public sculptures, and the "Dots Obsessions" paintings.

    Artist's Objects:

    • Yayoi Kusama - Nets Infinity Nets Infinity

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  • Sol Lewitt  (+)

    Biography : One of the leading exponents of Conceptual art, Sol LeWitt stressed the idea behind his work over its execution. “A blind man can make art if what is in his mind can be passed to another mind in some tangible form,” he once said. LeWitt is best known for his large-scale “Wall Drawings,” rigorous arrays of designs, shapes, grids, and colors rendered in pencil and paint in coherence with strict instructions and diagrams to be followed in executing the work. LeWitt made over 1,200 of these works in his career, his visual vocabulary in strong alignment with Minimalism despite his rejection of the movement. His “structures”, as he preferred to call sculptures, were variations on geometric shapes, constructed from steel, polyurethane, or concrete, often featuring stacked cubes without sides. LeWitt is one of the seminal artists of the late 20th and early 21st centuries, influencing artists like Eva Hesse and Frank Stella, among countless others.

    Artist's Objects:

    • Sol Lewitt - Horizontal Brushstrokes in Color Horizontal Brushstrokes in Color

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  • Roy Lichtenstein  (+)

    Biography : When American Pop artist Roy Lichtenstein painted Look Mickey in 1961, it set the tone for his career. This primary-color portrait of the cartoon mouse introduced Lichtenstein’s detached and deadpan style at a time when introspective Abstract Expressionism reigned. Mining material from advertisements, comics, and the everyday, Lichtenstein brought what was then a great taboo—commercial art—into the gallery. He stressed the artificiality of his images by painting them as though they’d come from a commercial press, with the flat, single-color Ben-Day dots of the newspaper meticulously rendered by hand using paint and stencils. Later in his career, Lichtenstein extended his source material to art history, including the work of Claude Monet and Pablo Picasso, and experimented with three-dimensional works. Lichtenstein’s use of appropriated imagery has influenced artists such as Richard Prince, Jeff Koons, and Raymond Pettibon.

    Artist's Objects:

    • Roy Lichtenstein - Drawing for Modern Painting Triptych II, 1967 Drawing for Modern Painting Triptych II, 1967

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  • Richard Serra  (+)

    Biography : Born in 1939, Richard Serra is best known for his minimalist works and monumental sculptures. Working across a range of mediums, including steel, graphite, paintstick, and even rubber, Serra's practice revolves around intense attention to materiality. His steel sculptures, featured in Dia: Beacon, tower above the visitor, and forces him or her to weave through the torque ellipses in often-dizzying ways. These sculptures reveal the attention to proportion, interaction, and experience of his works, and the exploration of the physical properties of steel itself. Many of these principles are also translated across his drawings, and other two-dimensional works. A graduate of the MFA at Yale School of Art, his works are collected by institutions such as the Guggenheim Bilbao, San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, Tate London, and others.

    Artist's Objects:

    • Richard Serra - Curve 2 Curve 2
    • Richard Serra - L-1 L-1

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  • Joaquin Torres-Garcia  (+)

    Biography : Born in Montevideo, Uruguay, Joaquín Torres-García is considered the pioneer of Latin American Constructivism today. Over his four-decade career, Torres-García's executed countless oil paintings that depicted interior scenes, landscapes, and still lifes. His practice contributed greatly to both the movements of European and Latin American Modernism; by stressing qualities of Constructivism, and incorporating references to Cubism and Primitivism into his works, Torres-García created a distinctive aesthetic. During his adult life, he collaborated with architectural master Antoni Gaudi, and befriended Pablo Picasso; eventually, he would travel to both New York and Paris. A theorist and teacher, Torres-García was also known for his influence on numerous painters. He has been the subject of retrospectives and exhibitions in venues such as The Museum of Modern Art, New York, The Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam, Palazzo Grassi, Venice, and many more.

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  • Joaquín Torres-García  (+)

    Artist's Objects:

    • Joaquín Torres-García - Constructivo a cinco tonos con dos figuras discutiendo Constructivo a cinco tonos con dos figuras discutiendo

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  • Tom Wesselmann  (+)

    Biography : Tom Wesselmann is considered one of the major artists of New York Pop Art, along with Roy Lichtenstein and Andy Warhol. Best known for his 1960s series “Great American Nude,” which featured flat figures in an intense palette of red, white, blue, and other patriotic colors, Wesselmann, in an effort to reject Abstract Expressionism, made collages and assemblages that incorporated everyday objects and advertising ephemera. In the early 1980s, he produced his first "Metal Works,” in which he shaped canvases and cut metal to create abstract three-dimensional images. In his final years, Wesselmann returned to the female form in the “Sunset Nudes” series, where the compositions, abstract imagery, and sanguine moods recall the odalisques of Henri Matisse.

    Artist's Objects:

    • Tom Wesselmann - Bedroom Blond, Black and Green Pillows Bedroom Blond, Black and Green Pillows

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Other Represented Artists